Reviews

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Sabotage

Reviewed by darthrodney

  • Currently 1/5 Stars.

You don't expect much from an Arnie action flick but this was unbelievably awful. The direction is clumsy and amateurish, the acting jobs are just beyond awful and the dialogue feels like its written by a 6 year old. Just rewatch "Commando" or "Predator" again you'll enjoy it a lot more than this rubbish.

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Reviewed by Starbuckie

  • Currently 5/5 Stars.

Epic, flawless, intelligent, emotional and one of the best films I have seen all year.

Begin Again

Reviewed by Randy

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

It's a sweet movie, lots of improvisation from two talented leads, but it's just that - it doesn't sweep you off your feet. Best left for a movie evening at home.

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Reviewed by Randy

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

The film showcases the very best of CGI & motion capture today. Storywise, the flick is solid apart from many predictable 'twists' and characters. A huge thorn in the side is how under-used female (esp. chimp) characters are. They're just left to feel miserable. Ultimately, the film feels like a filler before a big show-down in the next installment, but it's a fair glimpse of what can be done these days.

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Reviewed by roberthughes23

  • Currently 5/5 Stars.

Just bloody brilliant! Great story line that carry's on from 10 years after the first movie. Special effects are outstanding and everything about it is just great. Go see it!

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Reviewed by emer

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

In 2011 Rise of the Planet Of the Apes was an unexpected smash hit and now this superb sequel, Dawn of the Planet Of the Apes raises the bar even higher. This film is much darker and more tragic - we witness the simian revolution reaching unprecedented levels of anarchy as the troubled apes strive for their independence, with shocking results. It is a great action/science fiction movie – technically impressive, vivid, tense and violent and leaves you with plenty to think about. The action begins almost a decade after the first film left off and the situation at the outset is pretty clear, so even if you missed the first film, you will have no trouble catching up. The Simian virus unleashed at the end of Rise has wiped out most of the world’s human population and left the rest desperate to survive. During those bleak years, the apes flourished building a home for themselves, happy that they had no humans to contend with. The ape community is now much enlarged and integrated with enhanced capabilities – they can ride horses, handle firearms and communicate mostly through a type of sign language, relayed through subtitles. Caesar (played by Andy Serkis) is now an adult ape with responsibilities. He has united the rest of the apes, and the world that they've made for themselves is harmonious and peaceful. The forests they inhabit are gorgeous and made even better watching the film in 3D. The visual effects work superbly well - you’re enveloped by dark, thick greens, wet leaves, clouds, mist and moisture. You will recognise several of the apes from the first film, like the orangutan Maurice (Karin Konoval), the loyal chimp Rocket (Terry Notary), and Cornelia (Judy Greer), who is now Caesar's wife. The world has been plunged into a new dark age. There are a few remaining bands of survivors who exist in isolation which means they have trouble getting basic resources. They are led by Dreyfus (Gary Oldman), a former military man furious that his family was lost to the virus. Cautious, former architect and widower Malcolm (Jason Clarke), his nurse girlfriend Ellie (Keri Russell) and Malcolm’s insecure teen son Alexander (Kodi Smit-McPhee) spearhead a project to locate a dam in ape territory. They need it so that they can recover the city’s electricity. With relationships between the apes and humans still desperately fragile, this is a dangerous undertaking and it means they will have to encroach on land which is ruled by Caesar. Caesar knows that the way to maintain peace is through co operation and he grants them limited access to the dam. However, not all the apes approve and particularly irate is Koba (Toby Kebbell), a hot-headed and human-hating ape for whom the only good human is a dead human. He is distrustful and cannot see any good in humans in the way that Caesar can. A fragile truce is eventually formed but fear, ignorance and mistrust threaten to destroy the goodwill. When one of the humans is revealed to have broken Caesar’s “no guns” condition, events take a dramatic and violent turn. The great Caesar, thought dead, is replaced by Koba, who is intimidating and forceful and launches a very aggressive counter-movement. Once the humans have come in contact with the apes, tragedy is inevitable. An initial ape foray into the city is shocking and the mass violence and destruction that soon follows is a bitter reminder of the evils of war. Regardless of which side you will take, the fallout is spectacular and the big showdown is both amazing and frightening. The previous film’s cast is almost entirely replaced but Andy Serkis has crucially been promoted to the role of Caesar. Serkis is remarkable and continues to demonstrate how rich and interesting an actor he is. He gives the most expressive, soulful, deeply felt performance of a non-human character I have ever seen, giving us anger, pity, trust and despair, mostly with his facial expressions and body language. Kebbel is a real surprise - his work is fantastic and he really convinces us with his brute physicality and deeply felt ire. He strongly captures the slow but clever way Koba gathers his nerves before finally replacing the greatly revered Caesar. Between the two of them, I could have watched an entire film that didn't even deal with human beings at all! On all levels, this movie is memorable and powerful. It is a truly gripping account of interspecies conflict, shattered trusts and the tragic failure to coexist and it will not disappoint. Using a predominantly simian cast, it manages to produce a very powerful statement and will leave you questioning who we are and whether we really deserve ownership of the planet. I was not only impressed by this movie but deeply moved and I have no doubt it will do extremely well worldwide. It is as good as any big-budget science fiction movie gets both technically, visually and emotionally – don’t miss it!

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Reviewed by darthrodney

  • Currently 5/5 Stars.

A blockbuster they way is should be (take note Michael Bay!), the SFX are amazing so much so you forget the apes are CGI due to the strength of the emoting they portray on screen, the action is top notch and FINALLY a summer blockbuster with a coherent logical story!!! What I loved too was too much wasn't given away in the trailer, this isn't as cut and dry and "by the numbers" as you might expect. Good performances all round and Andy Serkis really should get consideration for an oscar. Excellent movie.

Grand Central

Reviewed by filmbuff2011

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

Grand Central has nothing to do with trains or even Manhattan. However, it wouldn't be hard to imagine this moody French drama playing out in blue collar Pennsylvania, as there's more than a touch of American influence to it. Gary (Tahar Rahim) is a drifter and unskilled labourer who applies for a job working in a nuclear power plant. Having gone through rigorous tests to ensure his suitability for the job, he finds himself dealing with radiation leakage on a daily basis. But the heat from the work is nothing compared to the lust at first sight when he encounters sultry siren Karole (Lea Seydoux). She also works at the plant along with her fiancé Toni (Denis Menochet). Things heat up even further between Gary and Karole, while Toni starts to suspect something is going on... In her second feature, Rebecca Zlotowski has crafted a well-acted if not entirely satisfying drama. Rising actors Rahim and Seydoux certainly let the sparks fly between their characters, even if their dangerous liaisons seem to occur in bushes and fields rather than bedrooms. As a result, their connection never really feels that strong - particularly when an indecisive Karole see-saws between Gary and Toni. The nuclear power plant backdrop is an interesting parallel storyline, with filming taking place in actual power plants in France and Austria. The dangers of working around radiation are well illustrated, but so also are the dangers of rubbing another man's rhubarb, as Jack Nicholson's Joker would put it. The ending is a bit abrupt, but overall this is a decent if not quite memorable French affair.

Transformers 4: Age of Extinction

Reviewed by Starbuckie

  • Currently 1/5 Stars.

I suspected it might be terrible going in so I really should not have been that surprised on how bad it actually was.

Begin Again

Reviewed by Starbuckie

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.

Sweet, funny and kind of adorable. Plus the soundtrack is awesome.

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Reviewed by vu1999uk

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.

Top notch summer blockbusters are coming thick and fast this summer, and this is another. Even better than the 2011 film it follows, this action adventure is nicely dark throughout. The plot is excellent, the cast superb, and some of the special effects set pieces are breathtaking. All summer films should be this good.

Cold Comes the Night

Reviewed by vu1999uk

  • Currently 2/5 Stars.

Solid if unremarkable thriller with Alice Eve and Bryan Cranston. Just never goes beyond okay due to a weak script and questionable turns. But the cast do their best, but has to go down as wasted opportunity.

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