Reviews

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Annie

Reviewed by Starbuckie

  • Currently 1/5 Stars.

Wrong on every possible level.

The Hobbit The Battle of The Five Armies

Reviewed by Patrick Rock

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.

An unexpected Journey was in quite a lot of aspects, a huge letdown. Desolation of Smaug was quite a huge improvement. The battle of Five Armies is, by all accounts, the second best of The Hobbit Trilogy. Considering this is a movie that essentially takes a handful of pages from the novel into a full length movie. I'm not complaining, I'm a hobbit geek. The opening scene of Smaug giving Laketown his Durin's day Present is quite god, but its apparent that jackson has been in the motion Capture stage really going crazy on the rough shots. He has been quoted on saying he wanted the film to have a war photography style, and it shows in quite a lot of the film. The battle itself is quite brief, as we follow the dwarves fight their way to the big bad. The movies first two thirds really concentrates on the greed and manipulation of wealth. Its where Richard Armitage really shines as Thorin. He is the Villain and hero of this film. Saying that, and gushing about it, this film isn't perfect. Billy Connolly shows up as Dain, Heaped with CGI. He filmed his scenes without CGI and its quite a distraction. Certain actors are shorter and without a deep voice compared to the second movie (Bard's son is a foot taller with a deep voice in Smaug, here he isn't. Proof that Jackson really reshoots the hell out of smaug a year after he filmed originally. Admittedly I'm clutching at straws) So after saying that if you're a fan go see it, especially on HFR 48FPS.

Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb

Reviewed by Patrick Rock

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

I expected this to be terrible after seeing the second movie, As that was just horrendous. Surprisingly its quite watchable, dan stevens of Downton Abbey and The Guest is one of the people that saves it from just mediocrity. including a small cameo which i will not name, but is self indulgent but funny at the same time. If you want something serious go watch Mockingjay pt1, if you want a silly film where a monkey urinates on Owen Wilson and Steve Coogan, Twice, then go see this.

Kon-Tiki

Reviewed by filmbuff2011

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.

Cast your mind back to last year's Oscars and you may remember Norway's entry - the unusually monikered Kon-Tiki. For some reason, it's taken two years to reach these shores, but it's been worth the wait. In post-WWII Norway, adventurer and explorer Thor Heyerdahl (Pal Sverre Hagen) is a maverick among his peers. He belives that Polynesia was settled not by Asians but by South Americans. He sets out to prove this theory by sailing in a large balsa-wood raft, the Kon-Tiki, across the Pacific Ocean, just like the explorer Tiki before him. Setting out from Peru with five other explorers on the raft, the group will face storms, whales, sharks and their own inner conflict, as Heyerdahl drives them to make history... Co-directed by Joachim Ronning and Espen Sandberg, Kon-Tiki is a thrilling adventure and survival story, a cousin of sorts to last year's memorable All Is Lost. What makes the film so accessible is the sense of adventure and wonder about the sea - the environment and its inhabitants. Life Of Pi would be another reference point here, but Kon-Tiki feels like its own contribution to the survivors-at-sea story. The cinematography and international location work are nothing less than outstanding. This is a very cinematic film that achieves an ideal balance between locations, stunt work, acting and controlled direction. No rudderless scenes here - they each serve a purpose in telling Heyerdahl's quite extraordinary story. Kon-Tiki is a rich and rewarding alternative film for the Christmas period.

The Homesman

Reviewed by JDX

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.

this movie was something a bit different to see in the cinema, i thoroughly enjoyed it, Hilary Swank and TLJ were great together and I felt the storyline flowed nicely, some interesting twists, overall a great film.

The Hobbit The Battle of The Five Armies

Reviewed by JDX

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.

Loved the finale to the Hobbit trilogy, really felt it lead well into the LOTR. Really felt they kept the quality and story line exciting, and the special effects were amazing!!

The Hobbit The Battle of The Five Armies

Reviewed by emer

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

“The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies! is the third and final chapter in Peter Jackson’s adaptation of JRR Tolkien’s The Hobbit and it brings to an epic conclusion the adventures of Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage) and the Company of Dwarves. For me, this final visit to Middle Earth is hugely satisfying. It is certainly the most purely entertaining, the darkest and most engaging. It is a very fitting conclusion to the trilogy and director Peter Jackson has successfully pulled all the films together in a way that makes me very glad I took the journey through Middle Earth and back again. The movie picks up where the previous installment left off with the fearsome dragon Smaug (one of the movie’s most special effects voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch) swooping down and breathing fire down on the terrorized Laketown citizens who disperse in panic. It’s a riveting sequence and the dragon exudes a great sense of powerful majesty until he is brought thunderously to his death by emerging hero, the Bard of Bowman (Luke Evans), who then leads the survivors to the Lonely mountain, where others are also converging. Drawn by ancient grudges and the chance to collect their share of the treasures no longer guarded by Smaug, a quintet of mighty armies descend on the city of Erebor to battle it out for wealth, power and the fate of Middle Earth. The relief of Smaug’s annihilation is short lived as Gandalf has seen the real danger which is that the evil Sauron has sent forward legions of orcs, which are now gathering on the horizon and ready to wage a war. Dwarf, hobbit and man must unite to save Middle Earth and restore the treasure to its rightful owners or else be destroyed. Bilbo and his friends are left fighting for their lives and for the future of Middle-earth. Martin Freeman is perfectly cast as the titular hobbit and this film shows how he has really grown into the character. He conveys Bilbo as an honest, good man, a good friend who genuinely wants to see everyone treated fairly. It’s not until the end that we see cracks in his character as the Ring exerts its influence. In this film, he's given the opportunity to be more outwardly heroic and connect with the other characters on a deeper level. He makes tough decisions and stands by them. I think the formerly little-known Richard Armitage as Thorin emerges as the dominant actor. His descent into madness is played with great intensity as he succumbs to the lure of power and riches, sacrificing friendship and honour in his search for the legendary Arkenstone. Orlando Bloom as Legolas is given more screen time here too and Gandalf is reliable as the glue that holds the disparate parts of the film together. The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies is easily the best film of the three. There’s an engrossing momentum to the film that escalates right up until the actual battle begins. Jackson is very good at keeping the set pieces fast paced and energetic, moving swiftly between fights and locations. The battle itself is grandly staged, thrilling and constantly shifting between dwarves, elves, men and orcs. It takes place over the best part of an hour but never feels like it drags. Maximum use is made of modern technology and it is really ground breaking in terms of crowd simulations and the number of computer generated characters on screen at any given time. The overall result is a robust-looking, CGI-dominant film with great detail, dazzling design and explosive imagery which stands as a worthy successor to The Lord of The Rings.

The Hobbit The Battle of The Five Armies

Reviewed by darthrodney

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

To paraphrase Bilbo this film … feels thin, like butter spread over too much bread. These movies would have been much stronger as 2 movies not spread out over three. All three movies feel like you’re watching extended directors cuts in the cinema and it truly shows in this last episode. The Tauriel/Fili and Azog story lines fall pretty flat. Then add in the Sfx of the battle where it’s CLEARLY evident that some characters are CGI but in LOTR the battles were so good because practical effects were used so well. Overall it’s not a bad movie just not up to the incredible standards of the LoTR trilogy. There are some great performances, most notably by Martin Freeman. Good but not great.

Tammy

Reviewed by hammer

  • Currently 1/5 Stars.

Transformers 4: Age of Extinction

Reviewed by hammer

  • Currently 1/5 Stars.

Should have left it at 1.

The Imitation Game

Reviewed by hammer

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.

Benedict Cumberbatch was fantastic in his portrayal of Turing, as he usually is, and with some great supporting roles, this film is definitely worth the time. If you're looking for an interesting story and a strong character performance, the Imitation Game delivers. I felt certain aspects of the story were poorly developed, but still a good movie and some tear jerking moments.

2001: A Space Odyssey

Reviewed by hammer

  • Currently 5/5 Stars.

Fanstastic. Just utterly fantastic.

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