Reviews

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Night Moves

  • Currently 1/5 Stars.

NIGHT MOVES (USA/15A/112mins)
Directed by Kelly Reichardt. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Alia Shawkat, Dakota Fanning, Peter Sarsgaard.
THE PLOT: A group of environmentalists set out to destroy a dam, in the hope of waking consumers up from their product laced coma. Things take a turn, however, when their plan goes almost exactly according to plan.
THE VERDICT: It is hard to say exactly what the story of NIGHT MOVES is, not because it is trying to be too many things, but perhaps because it is trying to be too few. Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard are the centre of the film, and they all do things we have seen them do before; albeit with considerably less flair. Eisenberg plays the jealous man set out on the fringes of the group, Fanning a completely vanilla girl who wants to wake people up, although it is hard to know what her motivation is, and Sarsgaard a charming and mysterious loner.
The story, written by Jonathan Raymond and Kelly Reichardt appears to be all about the slow burn of the dangerous environmental mission that these characters undertake, and for the first hour, it is. After that, the movie descends into meandering shots of the beautiful world - where is the destruction that the characters so lament? - with very little character development or a chance for the story to move forward. Perhaps we are told all we need at the start of the film when Jesse Eisenberg callously deals with a dead doe, who he finds to be pregnant, or perhaps I am trying to find meaning in a meaningless mess.
As director, Kelly Reichardt does not allow the characters to do anything but be in place to recite lines, and much of the exciting action of the film - which may have coaxed a reaction from those at the film's centre - happens off screen. The pacing drags, meaning the film feels distinctly like one of two halves, where each half is drawn out for no apparent reason.
NIGHT MOVES may have started off as a film with a powerful human or environmental message, but this is lost in bad pacing, vanilla characters and a complete lack of direction. Go and watch The East instead; it's not perfect, but it's a darn sight better than watching this glacier of a movie work its way across the screen. Night may move, but this film does not.
RATING: 1/5
Review by Brogen Hayes 

Obvious Child

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.

OBVIOUS CHILD (USA/16/84mins)
Directed by Gillian Robespierre. Starring Jenny Slate, David Cross, Jake Lacy.
THE PLOT: Donna (Jenny Slate) works in a book store by day, and as a stand up comic by night. When her boyfriend breaks up with her for sharing too many personal details in her act, Donna has a one night stand with Max (Jake Lacy), a sweet and gentle guy, who Donna would never normally go for. Donna falls pregnant from their brief tryst, and has to finally face the ideas of adulthood, woman hood and friendship head on.
THE VERDICT: Jenny Slade is known to many as the brash and boisterous Mona Lisa in PARKS AND RECREATION, and she channels her quick fire wit into her performance as Donna. As well as this, Slade makes the character familiar and engaging; we have all met girls like Donna, or been her in our 20s. Slade is funny and warm, while not being afraid to show vulnerability and fear. Jake Lacy makes Max a sweet but seemingly ‘vanilla' guy, he comes into his own when crisis strikes, reminding Donna - and the audience - that nice guys do not always finish last. The rest of the cast is made up of Gabe Leidmann, Gaby Hoffman, Richard Kind and David Cross.
Karen Maine and Elisabeth Holm's screenplay shines a light on the often-ignored phenomenon of the ‘Woman Child'. Donna is confident and self assured until her world takes a tumble, so she clambers back into bed with her mum for reassurance and comfort. That said, although Donna is shaken to her core by her unexpected pregnancy, she does manage to find strength and comedy in the situation, although she may not handle it as well as she could have. The film stumbles a little in terms of pacing, as it is sometimes unclear as to where the story is going.
Robespierre directs competently, allowing Slade's natural comedic talents to shine. The film may feels a little like an extended, crisis episode of Girls, but Slade, while brash at times, is always endearing and relatable.
OBVIOUS CHILD may be a little bit of a mess in terms of pacing and focus, but Jenny Slade is fantastic in the leading role, the story is relatable, engaging, and finds the comedy in a dark and emotionally overwhelming situation. Improvements could be made, but in the meantime, keep an eye out for Slade and Robespierre.
RATING: 4/5
Review by Brogen Hayes

Let's Be Cops

  • Currently 2/5 Stars.

LET'S BE COPS (USA/15A/104mins)
Directed by Luke Greenfield. Starring Jake Johnson, Damon Wayans Jr., Rob Riggle, Nina Dobrev, James D'Arcy, Keegan-Michael Key, Andy Garcia.
THE PLOT: Life is far from rosy for 30-year-old buddies Ryan (Johnson) and Justin (Wayans), but they soon realise what it might be like to be respected, righteous and ravished when they dress up as cops for what they thought was a fancy dress party. Mistaken for the real thing, the duo quickly realise that this new fake identity is a whole lot more rewarding than their real identities. And so it is that Ryan and Justin set about convincing people that, hey, they really are two of LA's finest...
THE VERDICT: A family that makes Tyler Perry look like Orson Welles, the Wayans have produced some of the most slapdash slapstick to hit our multiplex screens over the last three decades (feels longer). And now the younger generation are joining the family business - and you'll all be glad to know that Damon Wayans Jr. is keeping the bar real, real low. But, how low can you go, when you're following the likes of MAJOR PAYNE, WHITE CHICKS, LITTLE MAN and DANCE FLICK? Well, lo and behold, LET'S BE COPS might actually be a certifiable low point for the Wayans family cavalcade of comedy crap. Then again, it could be one of their best. It's hard to tell the difference.
Arrested development, indeed. 
RATING: 2/5
Review by Paul Byrne

The Grand Seduction

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

THE GRAND SEDUCTION (USA/12A/113mins)
Directed by Don McKellar. Starring Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban, Gordon Pinsent, Anna Hopkins, Rhonda Rodgers, John Bartlett, Carly Boone.
THE PLOT: With their very quiet little Newfoundland harbour in danger of becoming extinct - even the mayor has packed up and gone to the mainland - the residents of Tickle Head might just be able to bring some pride, and wages, back to their fishing village if they can convince a large petroleum giant to plant their refinery there. Only trouble is, the large petroleum giant needs Tickle Head to have a resident doctor. And its sleazy CEO would like a little $100,000 bride on the side too.
Nonetheless, proud Tickle Header Murray French (Gleeson) isn't about to see the family home fade away, and with that former-mayor-turned-airport-security stumbling upon some cocaine in the luggage of one Dr. Paul Lewis (Kitsch), a deal is struck. No cocaine was spotted if the good doctor spends a month on Tickle Head. Where the wily residents soon set out a major deception, faking a shared love for the doctor's beloved cricket, adding his favourite dish to the local cafe, and generally trying to convince their reluctant visitor that he's found a tailor-made paradise...
THE VERDICT: As all struggling little towns and villages in movieland now know, when you're ailing, go Ealing, The Grand Seduction enclave of burly, bearded bowsies suggesting this really should have been called Whiskers Galore. Or maybe they could have gone with Faking Ned Devine? Either way, everyone on Tickle Head looks like they're related to Willie Nelson. And one or two of the women look like they might actually be Willie Nelson.
Gleeson - Ireland's answer to Jeff Bridges - is a solid centre to all the wry silliness, even if his accent sounds a little unseaworthy, whilst failed Hollywood hunk Taylor Kitsch does a fine job too, looking, sounding and acting like Timothy Olyphant's chunkier brother.
Based on the eponymous 2003 French-Canadian farce, THE GRAND SEDUCTION makes up for what it lacks in originality with plenty of warm, wily, Sunday afternoon humour. 
RATING: 3/5
review by Paul Byrne

Lucy

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

LUCY (France/15A/89mins)
Directed by Luc Besson. Starring Scarlett Johansson, Morgan Freeman, Min-sik Choi, Amr Waked, Julian Rhind-Tutt, Pilou Asbaek, Analeigh Tipton, Jan Oliver Schroeder, Luca Angeletti.
THE PLOT: Whilst holidaying hard in Taipei, American party girl Lucy (Johansson) finds herself forced into a supposedly simple briefcase drop-off by her sleazy boyfriend of one week - and suddenly, she's in the middle of Oldboy. The briefcase belongs to crime boss Mr. Yang (Choi, from, yep, Oldboy), and it contains a new synthetic drug designed for the final weeks of pregnancy. The petrified Lucy soon has a bag of it surgically implanted in her stomach, her new life as a drug mule cut short when the bag bursts, and she gets a sudden rush to the brain. Which proves to be something of a spider bite, giving Lucy ever-increasing brain power. Something Professor Norman (Freeman, being very Morgan Freeman) has been researching heavily - which is why Lucy gets in touch, hoping to find out her fate as she goes full Neo-in-lacy-knickers on everyone's ass.
THE VERDICT: What is it about Luc Besson movies that, despite all their slinky, figure-hugging visuals and sexy plotting, they pretty much always fall short? At heart, the man is Michael Bay in a beret, more concerned with those trailer-worthy money shots than with such stuffy nonsense as story development or character arc.
There's nothing wrong with a little pulp action every now and then, of course, but Besson films always promise so much - and the bugger always throws so much into them - that it's particularly disappointing when his cartoon noir always turns out to be far more Itchy & Scratchy than Bogart and Bacall. Johansson does her mouth-agape, hips-a-swivellin' Marilyn Monroe routine, but Besson's weaknesses as a filmmaker merely exposes Scarlett's.
Besson is particularly heavy-handed here with interjected clips from the likes of Ron Fricke's SAMSARA, just so we understand that whole circle-of-life, what's-it-all-about-Alfie? undercurrent here.
RATING: 3/5
Review by Paul Byrne 

What If

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.

Directed by Michael Dowse. Starring Daniel Radcliffe, Zoe Kazan, Rafe Spall, Adam Driver>
THE PLOT: 
When Wallace (Daniel Radcliffe) and Chantry (Zoe Kazan) meet at a party, they immediately hit it off. Wallace walks Chantry home and she gives him her number. The only catch is, she has a long-term boyfriend. Wallace has to decide whether he really wants to be just friends with Chantry and whether he can stand to have his heart broken again.
THE VERDICT: Based on the play TOOTHPASTE AND CIGARS by T.J. Dawe and Michael Rinaldi, What If (apparently still titled THE F WORD in much of the world) takes the romantic comedy and does something new with it, putting a new twist on a genre that lost steam approximately 5 Cameron Diaz movies ago.
Daniel Radcliffe finally puts his breathy, Harry Potter acting to bed with What If, and plays a funny, sweet and cautious character, the perfect manic pixie boy foil to Zoe Kazan's manic pixie girl Chantry. Although that said, neither one is particularly manic... Or pixie like. Instead, we are shown the story of two characters who find a connection with one another, through shared sense of humour. Kazan plays a character who feels like a watered down version of Ruby Sparks, but she still manages to make Chantry engaging and warm.
Adam Driver plays Alan, the catalyst for Chantry and Wallace's relationship. Alan spontaneous and headstrong, making him the perfect best friend to Wallace, and leading to some great clashes of ideals between the characters. Rafe Spall plays Chantry's boyfriend Ben. The character is not as evil or sleazy as he could have been, but Spall still manages to make him a bit of a jerk and keep the audience on Wallace's side.
The screenplay, written by Elan Mastai takes every cliché from the romantic comedy genre and turns it on its head, while still managing to keep the film funny and warm. The big gestures happen, but are missed, the moments for public embarrassment happen, but are skipped, and somehow Wallace ends up being set up with Chantry's sister. The rapid-fire banter between the characters is where much of the comedy comes from, but the frustrations that develop between the characters feel real and familiar.
Director Michael Dowse has experience with light-hearted romantic films - such as TAKE ME HOME TONIGHT - and he directs with a light touch here. Dissuading Daniel Radcliffe of his awkward manner of speaking is the best thing Dowse has done in his career, but as well as this, he allows the characters room to grow and get to know one another. The performances feel natural, Toronto looks amazing and - although the reasons for it are a little strange - Dublin is allowed to feature and look damn good on screen too.
Taking a cue from the great rom-coms that have gone before is a smart one, but turning conventions on their head makes What If one of the most surprising films of the year so far; instead of being familiar schmaltz, the film is filled with heart and warmth, and somehow still manages to reflect real life. Of course, it all still feels slightly unreal - and the geography of Dublin is off, again! - but WHAT IF is a charming, funny and sweet film.
RATING: 4/5
Review by Brogen Hayes

Deliver Us from Evil

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.

DELIVER US FROM EVIL (USA/16/118mins)
Directed by Scott Derrickson. Starring Eric Bana, Edgar Ramirez, Joel McHale, Sean Harris, Olivia Munn, Chris Coy, Dorian Missick.
THE PLOT: New York cop Ralph Sarchie (Bana) has seen it all on his South Bronx beat, and his latest string of cases - attempted infanticide, domestic violence, noisey neighbour - seem pretty standard fare. "Nothing that can't be explained by human nature," as he flatly states. Nothing, that is, until Ralph and his partner, Butler (McHale), realise that these latest cases are all connected - all investigations leading to former Marine Santino (Harris). Whiskey-guzzling Jesuit priest Mandoza (Ramirez) informs Sarchie that suspect no.1 is possessed - and given the week that Sarchie has had, he takes the claim seriously. Very seriously. Things have been going bump in the night in his own home of late, with some tell-tale scratches under his daughter's bed... 
THE VERDICT: Fans of smart horror will already be familiar with the work of Scott Derrickson, the writer/director behind HELLRAISER: INFERNO (2000), THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005) and SINISTER (2012), films that never tried too hard to play to the crowd. And he's at it again here, taking this true detective story (based on the real NY cop-turned-paranormal investigator Ralph Sarchie) that handily blends noir with the possession genre. The results are fittingly frightening, but far more rewarding than just a series of cheap shocks to the system.
It helps, having the likes of Bana as your main man, but the real diamond here might just be English actor Sean Harris, so effective in the likes of HARRY BROWN and the RED RIDING series. Harris does menacing beautifully, and his turn here as the demonic Santino is scarily convincing. 
One of those horror outings that will brown, season and thicken the underpants of even the toughest Bisto kid. 
RATING: 4/5 
Review by Paul Byrne 

Into the Storm

  • Currently 2/5 Stars.

INTO THE STORM (USA/12A/89mins)
Directed by. Starring Sarah Wayne Callies, Jeremy Sumpter, Pete Walsh, Richard Armitage.
THE PLOT: 
When a massive tornado threatens a small town, school kids, adults and storm chasers must find a way to survive. The trouble is, however, that humans cannot always control - or accurately predict - the weather.
THE VERDICT: 
It has been 18 years since TWISTER and evidently, the writer of STEP UP: ALL IN and the director of FINAL DESTINATION 5felt it was time that we all got scared of the weather again. As if living in Ireland didn't give us all the weather we needed.
The cast is made up of Sarah Wayne Callies - who has experience in looking scared and running away from her time on THE WALKING DEAD - Pete Walsh, Richard Armitage, Jeremy Sumpter and Stephanie Koenig. Everyone in the film does their job well, but they are given an underwritten script that focuses on the twee, the emotional and the oncoming storm, which is really the star of the show.
Screenwriter John Swetnam brought us one of the most ridiculously written movies of the year (so far) with STEP UP: ALL IN, and the dialogue in INTO THE STORM is not much better than his previous movie. The crucial difference though, is that it is better - even just slightly - and being faced with death gives the characters something to emote over. The dialogue is rather twee, however, and there are times when the film becomes predictable and familiar. As well as this, since there are so many, we never really get to know the characters, so when they are put in danger we are concerned, but never fearful for them, thus the focus shifts on the power of the storm, rather than the potential loss of characters that we care about.
Director Steven Quale tones down the melodrama from FINAL DESTINATION 5, and while the situations the characters are in are completely over the top, there are some nice touches - such as drunken idiots chasing the storm to upload the video and become YouTube famous being swept away. Not all of the peril comes from the immediacy of the twister itself, much of the danger comes in the storm's aftermath, meaning that the pace is kept up throughout the film.
INTO THE STORM is a film that suffers from having too many characters, and relying on spectacle to create emotion. That said, the storm scenes are terrific and although the emotion - when it does happen - is overplayed and slightly hokey, the film is still an entertaining watch, once you leave your brain at the door.
RATING: 2/5
Review by Brogen Hayes

The Congress

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

THE CONGRESS (Israel/Germany/Poland/Luxembourg/Belgium/France/15A/122mins)
Directed by Ali Folman. Starring Robin Wright, Harvey Keitel, Jon Hamm, Danny Huston, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Paul Giamatti, Sami Gayle, Michael Stahl-David.
THE PLOT: "You had it all, Robin," barks Al (Keitel) at the sad-faced, sunken 48-year-old actress, "a movie queen at 24, all the big studios came crawling, and you slammed all the open doors, crushed all the dreams." Well, Hollywood can sometimes be about second chances, especially if the height of your star power can be preserved forever inside a computer. And so it is that a desperate Wright heeds her agent's words and signs up to having her avatar unleashed upon the world - so she can finally say yes to all those roles that she was just too proud to allow on her CV back in those early, heady, idealistic days. All the real Robin Wright has to do is lay low, and let her sampled self do all the hard red carpet work. That her son, Aaron (Smit-McPhee), needs some expensive medical care helps with this bitter pill. Jump forward twenty years, and Wright is box-office gold, on her way to speak at a conference when we suddenly shift to animation. And a new perspective on this crazy world...
THE VERDICT: From the director of Waltz With Bashir, and based on Stanislaw Lem's 1971 novel The Futurological Congress, the notion of celebrity, identity, artificial intelligence, reality vs virtual, artistic worth versus box-office gross, and even just the age-old conundrum of aging are all addressed in The Congress. It's a film of smart questions if not exactly smart answers, the busy 1990s animation aping such cartoon travesties as Cool World and Space Jam, and the heavy-handed metaphysical musings conjuring up unwelcome Matrix sequel flashbacks. 
Still, it's an ambitious film, and a highly admirable one at that. Wright is the right choice for just such a role, and the fact that her career is actually in very fine fettle right now makes her doppelganger desperation here all the more devilish. There's just a little too much going on here, too much information, too many ideas, all bustling for space in a dizzyingly busy film. 
RATING: 3/5
Review by Paul Byrne 

The Rover

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

THE ROVER (Australia/16/102mins)
Directed by David Michod. Starring Guy Pearce, Robert Pattinson, Scoot McNairy, Tek Kong Lim, Tawanada Manyimo, David Field, Scott Perry.
THE PLOT: Australia, ten years after the collapse, we're told, and it's very much a dingo eat dingo world out there. All primary colours have been bleached out, and there's little more than rust and bone left, all jaded tattoos and faded glories. Silently feeling the weight of it all is the tightly-wound, tight-lipped Eric (Pearce, in full Proposition mode), taking a break in yet another ramshackle, galvanised bar when three fleeing, panicked criminals decide to steal his car. Giving chase, Eric wakes up dazed and somewhat slightly battered by the side of the dusty road - and even more determined to get his car back. When he stumbles upon an injured soldier, Rey (Pattinson), who turns out to be the left-for-dead brother of one of the car thieves, Eric quickly puts his newfound guide on a very short lease. Their relationship takes a few unexpected turns along the way though...
THE VERDICT: It has the tone, it has the look, it has the landscape (the Australian outback always looks like an aftermath), but there's something not quite there about this post-apocalyptic fable. It's not that Pattinson is still Elvis, thanks to the Twilight franchise (the kid is obviously trying very hard, and he may yet follow Leo into a real career), and it's not that the mighty Guy Pearce's Eric isn't so much Mad Max as Sad Sack; it's more to do with the overriding sense that we've been down this road before. In fellow Aussie director John Hillcoat's The Road, to be precise. With an extra-added pinch of Tommy Lee Jones' The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada, and a small side-order of Dude, Where's My Fucking Car?.
Also, it doesn't help that the trailer has the line ‘From Visionary Director David Michod'. Okay, so Animal Kingdom was beautiful, but you're crusing for a Shyamalan critical bruising with self-aggrandising huff'n'puff such as that. 
RATING: 3/5
Review by Paul Byrne

Dinosaur 13

  • Currently 3/5 Stars.

DINOSAUR 13 (USA/PG/93mins)
Directed by Todd Douglas Miller. Starring Peter Larson, Susan Hendrickson, Timothy Larson.
THE PLOT: In August 1990, a group of palaeontologists from the Black Hills Institute in Hilly City, South Dakota, discovered the fossilised skeleton of a huge Tyrannosaurus Rex, in a cliff face in Sotuh Dakota's Badlands. After carefully excavating the fossil - and paying the landowner $5,000 for the discovery - they took the skeleton home to prepare her for exhibition. A year later, the FBI and the National Guard seized the skeleton - affectionately named Sue, after Susan Hendrickson, the woman who first discovered her - claiming the skeleton had been stolen from the land. Sue languished in storage for several years, as a massive court battle was fought over her.
THE VERDICT: The title of DINOSAUR 13 comes from the fact that Sue was the 13th, largest and most complete T-Rex fossil to ever be found. At the time of Sue's discovery, and at the time she was seized by the US government, the case was shrouded in mystery, petty laws and controversy, with several parties laying claim to Sue, and protests at her removal taking place in Hill City.
Director Todd Douglas Miller has gone back to the beginning of the story, and told Sue's tale - and that of the Larson family who founded the Black Hills Institute - through talking heads and footage shot at the time. DINOSAUR 13 turns into a thriller documentary as the audience is brought on the incredible and tragic journey that the Larsons, Hill City and the Black Hills Institute survived.
Essentially, DINOSAUR 13 is the story of a legal battle, but what makes the story interesting is that it is the legal battle over a T-Rex; the biggest and most complete specimen ever found. The US government, the land holder where Sue was found, and those who found and lovingly cared for the fossil were dragged into a legal battle, which saw people imprisoned for petty crimes, families damaged and Sue held in storage for several years.
The trouble with the film is that it gets a little too caught up and bogged down in the legal issues surrounding Sue. This is the story from the perspective of the Black Hills Institute, who were prosecuted for theft for removing fossils, so of course it is a complicated and heart rending story, but a little more focus on the emotional fall out of the events, rather than the laws and crimes being tried could have made the middle section of the film more engaging.
DINOSAUR 13 is a heartbreaking, and astonishing story about people whose love for dinosaurs landed them in prison, and the incredible journey that Sue went on, millions of years after she died. The legal debates detract from the film slightly; the heart of the story is truly the people who dedicated years of their lives to Sue, and it could have been a stronger film with a more focused narrative.
RATING: 3/5
Review by Brogen Hayes

The Expendables 3

  • Currently 1/5 Stars.

THE EXPENDABLES 3 (USA | France/12A/126mins)
Directed by Patrick Hughes. Starring Sylvester Stallone, Antonio Banderas, Mel Gibson, Jason Statham, Wesley Snipes, Kellan Lutz.
THE PLOT: This time out, ‘the Expendables’ have their biggest fight yet on their hands; the co-founder of the team – Conrad Stonebanks (Mel Gibson) – has become a ruthless arms dealer who has sworn to take down the team he helped to create. 
THE VERDICT: The first EXPENDABLES movie was a nice little curiosity; the old team back together, or rather, a lot of actors who are getting on years, teaming up to fight the bad guys. This time out, the novelty factor has gone, however, and what is left is tonally confusing and often cringe worthy. 
Stallone has written the third XPENDABLES outing, and it is obvious that he is incredibly attached to the project. So much so, in fact, that it feels as though his performance belongs in a different film than the rest of the cast; SCHINDLER'S LIST? Maybe. The rest of the team seem to know that the film is a ridiculous 1960s Bond rip-off, and layer their performances as such. Standouts have to be Mel Gibson – who delivers ridiculous threats with aplomb – and Antonio Banderas, who is just as fast talking and zany as he is in real life.
The story is nothing new, exciting or anything to write home about. Stallone’s screenplay borrows from the great action movies of the past, and throws in tons of terrible quips, real life details about the actors – Snipes’ character jokes that he was in prison for tax evasion – and what feels like hours of exposition. As well as this, the stage is very much set for a reboot of the series with the younger actors. EXPENDABLES BABIES seems to be on the way.
As director, Patrick Hughes seems to have been intimidated by his cast, and the entire process of making the film. Most of the performances are entirely one note, plot holes abound and the editing is a mess. There are plenty of set pieces though, filled with explosions, fearless fights and supremely silly stunts. 
In all, THE EXPENDABLES 3 is a hot mess. The dialogue is more exposition than anything else, the editing is a mess and the film seems utterly unnecessary. A sequel is sure to be announced any day now. Sigh. 
RATING: 1/5
Review by Brogen Hayes

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